Women-Directed and Women-Centric Feature Films at 2018 Boston Underground Film Festival (BUFF)

My Name is Myeisha

Now in its twentieth year, BUFF is “committed to the celebration of alternative vision and cultivation of independent, provocative and experimental filmmaking.” … BUFF will run from March 21st-March 25th. Here are the women-directed and women-centric narrative and documentary films featured at the festival.

‘Ouija: Origin of Evil’: Grief, Motherhood, and Spirit Possession

Ouija Origin of Evil

‘Ouija: Origin of Evil’ may be a prequel, but it is first and foremost a tragic character piece. One in which a previously strong family dynamic is torn apart when malicious forces use Alice’s grief to manipulate her.

Why Skittles’ ‘Bite-Size Horror’ Is the Perfect Metaphor for American Society

Skittles ad "Floor 9.5"

But the “Kakfaesque nightmare” is the reality of social, political, and economic issues affecting society, imprinted on Americans’ collective unconscious. This commercial illustrates how deep the nightmare goes; that inequalities exist in the most dire, uncertain circumstances. And women are suffering the most for it.

Top 10 ‘Bitch Flicks’ Articles of All-Time in 2017

Moana

Here are our top 10 most popular articles in 2017, published at any time in the history of Bitch Flicks.

Top 10 ‘Bitch Flicks’ Articles Written in 2017

Marie Antoinette

Here are our top 10 most popular articles written in 2017.

‘Hush’: A Resourceful Heroine with Disabilities for the Horror Genre

Hush

In addition to featuring a female protagonist with disabilities, ‘Hush’ crafts a home-invasion story that isn’t about her “problems” or obstacles or the attacker at all, but rather it focuses on the tactful solutions she chooses along the way. …Its depiction of Maddie as a full, engaging character who fends for herself and thrives alone is an asset to adding more characters with disabilities in films, especially horror, as not victims but stars.

“You Can’t Sit with Us”: Witchy Girl Gangs and Covens

The Craft

Underwritten in this claim of selfhood, however, is a larger message. Each of the films and the TV series, to varying degrees, promote individuality over conformity. Eventually, each teaches viewers the importance of being true to yourself and avoiding the pitfalls of group mentality. …Each manifestation of the girl group trope proposes an affirmation of self-esteem, non-conformity, independence, and individuality.

Motherhood and Monsters in ‘Under The Shadow’

Under the Shadow

With regular bombings being an everyday part of their lives, and a warhead landing in the apartment above them, the two of them live under the “shadow of war” in a very real sense. … The jinn, and the hauntings, also serve as a metaphor for Shideh’s own insecurities about motherhood.

Suturing Selfhood: ‘American Mary’ and the Unconventional Feminine Repossession of Self

American Mary

This violence through language establishes a paradigm that persists throughout the film in which female expression, female control over their anatomy/body and others’ is aggressively and oppressively impugned upon and violated by male domination. Mary’s passion and talent — and thus selfhood — exists imperiled and impeached by the overtures of men.

‘Antibirth’ Continues the Cinematic Tradition of Pregnancy Being Icky

Antibirth

…Horror has a strong tradition of using pregnancy to creep-out audiences too. From ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ to ‘Inside’ we can see that this notion is pervasive. (Don’t even get me started on the horror after the child arrives, but I digress.) ‘Antibirth’ is an interesting new slant on the horror of pregnancy.

‘The Witch’ Will Transport You to Another World  —  A Beautiful, but Terrifying One

The Witch

‘The Witch’ is proof that when a film is made with utmost care down to the last detail, one can still be transported by it to another world  —  though, in the case of ‘The Witch,’ it is a downright creepy and unpleasant world, and one that I am grateful, as a woman, to not have to live in.

On Our Terms: A Black [Women’s] Horror Film Aesthetic

Ganja and Hess

What horrors are directly related to Black women? What elements, themes, aesthetic appeal would make a horror film a solid example of Black female centrality and agency? And even still, strike fear in a universal audience… Our ghosts: how are they different?