Roseanne

Call for Writers: Fatphobia/Fat Positivity

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Negative depictions of fat people are the norm throughout all of pop culture. Though fatphobia crosses racial, gender, and class lines, audiences judge women the most harshly. Fat characters are frequently shown as disgusting, sad, or unlovable. In the horror genre, fatness is frequently represented as terrifying and unnatural. In comedies, fat bodies are often the source of humor. Though few and far between, there are a growing number of fat positive representations popping up throughout TV and film.

Women and Work/Labor Issues: The Roundup

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Check out all of the posts for Women and Work/Labor Issues Theme Week here.

A Plea For More Roseannes and Norma Raes: Addressing The Lack of Working-Class Female Characters on American Screens

Working-class female protagonists remain rare, however. More often than not, working-class women play supporting roles as mothers, wives or lovers. Their characters are invariably underwritten or stereotypical.

Bitch Flicks’ Weekly Picks

Girls on Film: How women were written out of film history by Monika Bartyzel at The Week An Open Letter to Joss Whedon: I’m Not Asking for More Female Superheroes, I’m Demanding Them by Celeste Mora and xoJane New Film In a World… Gives Winning Voice to, Well, Women’s Voices by Andi Zeisler at Bitch […]

Bitch Flicks Weekly Picks

Girls on Film: How women were written out of film history by Monika Bartyzel at The Week An Open Letter to Joss Whedon: I’m Not Asking for More Female Superheroes, I’m Demanding Them by Celeste Mora and xoJane New Film In a World… Gives Winning Voice to, Well, Women’s Voices by Andi Zeisler at Bitch […]

Photo of the Day

The cast of Roseanne, all grown up I fucking love this show. So much. I wrote during our Reproduction & Abortion theme week about why I love this show so much: I grew up watching Roseanne. The show first aired in 1988—when I was ten years old—and it ended after 9 seasons, around the time […]

Reproduction & Abortion Week: ‘Roseanne’s’ Discussion of Abortion Nearly Twenty-Five Years Ago Highlights the Current Feminist Backlash

The cast of Roseanne I grew up watching Roseanne. The show first aired in 1988—when I was ten years old—and it ended after 9 seasons, around the time I graduated high school. The fact that the show now appears in reruns on various television stations, during all hours of the day and night, often makes […]

YouTube Break: Roseanne Barr Is Awesome

From the description at Democracy Now: In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Emmy Award-winning actress Roseanne Barr starred in the popular and groundbreaking show on television titled simply Roseanne, the first TV series to openly advocate for gay rights. Roseanne featured one of the first lesbian kisses on TV, in an episode when […]

Quote of the Day: Roseanne Barr

Roseanne Barr In her recent New York Magazine piece, Roseanne Barr talks about creating and starring in a number-one sitcom, and relates her experience to the breakdown of Charlie Sheen, the state of comedy today, and the hostility Hollywood has toward women–and especially working-class women. Here’s an excerpt. I highly recommend reading the entire piece […]

Quote of the Day: Janet McCabe

Feminist Film Studies: Writing the Woman into Cinema by Janet McCabe (2004). Part of the Wallflower Short Cuts Series. Leading comedic roles for women in film and television are often relegated to “romantic” comedy and these women still, in 2011, struggle to break into the classification of comedy–without modifiers–and remain relegated to the dreaded “chick […]